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revolutionary guard corps. hillary clinton a couple years ago said iran was edging close league to be in the military to peter should. i wonder when marina talks about this long history of abuse of political prisoners by the agents of that abuse had changed over this 20, 30 year span and whether the increased role has an impact on the human rights landscape. is the power of military know me making matters worse? >> thank you very much, ladies and gentlemen. and thanks to ftd for arranging a panel discussion about human rights. it's rather interesting that in the city in washington d.c., most panels about iran are about the nuclear program. that is almost nothing that the human rights program. the iranian audience in the reading public because it means you care about your own security. you care about the implications of the islamic republic coming into an armed state. what happens in iran does not really matter to washington. this is the signal washington has been sending to iran and i think this panel and ftd's initiative to make human rights issue a more important issue on agen
. secretary of state hillary clinton said today that the united states and russia to get syrian president al-assad to talk about the political transition and syria. she spoke yesterday with russia's for a minister and the u.n. peace envoy to the next conversation with u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford on president assad using chemical weapons. investor four was part of an event held by the foundation for defense of democracy is yesterday. this is about half an hour. >> the good morning. very nice to be here. let me thank andy for that very kind introduction and i would also like to thank john for inviting me here to talk to the foundation for the defense of democracy st. john and i go way back to when we were in iraq together. another tough situation where we were trying to help promote space change in the middle east. i am only going to talk for about ten minutes and then i would welcome some questions and a little more of a discussion. so just listening to me drone on. i want to take just one minute and give you my sense of the situation on the ground and syria, which is changing. and
president bush, president clinton, second president bush, now president obama. none of those other presidents were treated in the way this president is treated. it's something senate democrats have never done in a lame duck session, whether after a presidential or midterm election. in fact, the senate democrats allowed votes on 20 of president george w. bush's judicial nominees, including three circuit court nominees in the lame duck session after the election in 2002. i remember i was the chairman of the judiciary committee. i moved forward on those votes, including one very controversial circuit court nominee. the senate proceeded to confirm judicial nominees in lame duck sessions after the elections in 2004 and 2006. actually, in 2006, we confirmed another circuit court nominee. we proceeded to confirm 19 judicial nominees in lame duck sessions after the election of 2010, including five circuit court nominees. the reason i'm not listing confirmations for the lame duck session at the end of 2008 is because that year we proceeded to confirm the last ten judicial nominees approved
committee following a leadership of chairman clinton. we are in a tight schedule and 5 like to call up senator kc. i would be remiss if i did not recognize the presence here today of lieutenant-colonel larry lerlach. he was commander of an amphibious unit in lebanon. in october of 1983 hezbollah terrorists drove two trucks and exploded the american and french marine barracks. he survived it, 241 american women did not. he is here today with us. we thank you so much for your service and honoring us. [applause] >> welcome again to the foundation for defense of democracy's annual washington forum. my name is kenneth schwartz. i have the pleasure of introducing distinguished public official robert kc, senior senator from the state of pennsylvania. you served since 2007 as chairman of near east and south asia subcommittee, senate foreign relations committee only in the first term. one can scarcely imagine a more challenging time, the past two years in the middle east have seen wars in international borders, collapse of regimes in decades and the rise of political movements that may yet turn
in northern mali at our peril. in fact, secretary clinton has recently said that mali has now become a powder keg of potential instability in the region and beyond. the top american military commander in africa, general carter hamm, said publicly just this week that al qaeda's operating terrorist training camps in northern mali and providing arms, explosives and financing to other terrorist groups in the region. so i believe it's critical that the united states have a strong and comprehensive policy to deal with this threat. i'm concerned that the current u.s. approach may not be forward leaning enough to address all three crises -- security, political and humanitarian -- in a coordinated, comprehensive and effective way at the same time. given the compelling u.s. interest in stability and security and good governance in mali, we must ensure we don't miss the bigger picture of what this situation means for the future of mali, to our allies, and to our security. the u.n. security council is now considering what they call a concept of operations for an african-led military operation. the u.s. c
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5